2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults

From the American Heart Association

The 2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults co-led by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association has been released.

High blood pressure accounts for the second largest number of preventable heart disease and stroke deaths, second only to smoking. It’s known as the “silent killer” because often there are no symptoms, despite its role in significantly increasing the risk for heart disease and stroke.

The guidelines will replace the 2003 guidelines published by the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. In 2013, the National Institutes of Health entrusted the AHA and ACC to produce the first comprehensive guideline update in 14 years.

New guideline highlights include the following:

  • High blood pressure is now defined as readings of 130 mm Hg and higher for the systolic blood pressure measurement, or readings of 80 and higher for the diastolic measurement. That is a change from the old definition of 140/90 and higher, reflecting complications that can occur at those lower numbers.
  •  In the first update to comprehensive U.S. guidelines on blood pressure detection and treatment since 2003, the category of prehypertension is eliminated.
  • While about 14 percent more people will be diagnosed with high blood pressure and counseled about lifestyle changes, there will only be a small increase in those who will be prescribed medication.
  • By lowering the definition of high blood pressure, the guidelines recommend earlier intervention to prevent further increases in blood pressure and the complications of hypertension.

Resources:

For a more information, please visit the AHA website.

To learn more about how atom Alliance is helping to improve cardiac care in our five states, visit http://atomalliance.org/initiatives/improving-cardiac-health-reducing-disparities/.